Janet Haigh : Her Work

Textiles: ideas, drawing, design, stitching….

sleeping in the garden

15 Comments

garden1

the first fabrics chosen for the quilt using the planting story board.

My latest commission is to design and make a patchwork quilt to be placed on a bed in a show garden for this year’s RHS Flower Show at Tatton Park. This is the idea of plants-woman and garden designer, Julie Dunn, And I think that her design is really intriguing – to make a garden for recuperation and healing, full of scented plants and herbs that aid relaxation plus a double bed in which to rest.

When Julie first contacted me, I responded by asking for her ideas for the atmosphere of the garden, particularly her chosen plants, so that I could give her some fabrics to consider.

mood board

original and amusing plants and atmosphere visuals for the garden

She had very definite ideas of the actual fabrics that she wanted – they were by Kaffe Fassett and they featured flowering plants, most notably Brassica – the classic fabric featuring flowers that looks like roses but are in fact cabbages.

3greeny mauves

1 co-ordinated fabrics surrounding the favoured Brassica fabric

I pulled together several colour “stories” to choose from. although they are similar they give very different overall tones – I wanted the quilt to reflect and augment the garden, not overwhelm it

1 greys

2 grey version of Brassica with co-ordinates

The sheer scale and incongruity of the bed in the small ‘Back to Back” gardens in the show,  means that it will dominate if we are not careful with the pattern and the colours

4 greenier mauves

3 brighter, green and mauve colourways

The large enveloping quilt needs to give a feeling of comfort and protection as well as being light-weight and warm whilst the sleeper is wrapped up in it. I already knew what the backing fabric would be – Dream, one of my favourite Kaffe Fassett fabrics.

dreams

“Dream” fabric design – which colour to choose for the backing?

Julie and I spent a day in my studio, and with her visuals pinned to the quilt wall, we started to develop a design together. I wanted a very simple quilt design with large scale patches, as although a decent hand-stitcher I am not a happy machine stitcher,  particularly with the precision needed for patchwork.

garden quilt 2Working with the first of the colour-way choices shown above, I cut simple large scale heads from several shades of the Brassica fabric and simply made a chequer-board formation with them. This first attempt look too strongly coloured, but the simple square format was good as it showed the full ‘flower’ heads of the cabbages. But the simple deep pink strips looked too solid and they would dominate the entire quilt, we needed a  more subtle variation.  Cut  into triangular sections, the square becomes a diamond

 

g quilt 3

the next step of the design with the planing plans on quilt wall.

Julie was happier with this softer set of fabrics; strangely adding  more patterns and colours often makes a design more subtle, the secret is to work within a tonal  range – these red triangles dominate here – they may have to go eventually!

borders2

design development with more borders

I tried to balance the deep colour with a strong striped border but the dark blue stripes make the centre even more dominant. Julie wants the magenta red to stay as it is exactly the colour of a chosen Sanguisorba – I take her word for it.

g quilt 5

re-arranging the strips of fabric to build up the medallion design

working on through the afternoon we slowly we start to feel that the colours, although strong, are softened over all and now enough of the quilt is decided for me to carry on developing the design from here.

almost there

the colour balance is better, the flashes of magenta ‘Maple Stream’ leaves help.

The actual quilt needs to very large, Julie’s vision of it is to cover the bed almost to the floor, this useful as I see the bed to be a type of extending couch-  a day bed. Julie sees a four poster!

IMG_6393

the mood board for the bed element

We turn our minds to the application forms and read them extensively  and decide that I will illustrate the envisaged quilt on the envisaged bed in the envisaged garden…this I can do more easily than make the quilt, having illustrated all sorts of ‘envisaged’ designs for gardens, plants, embroideries, fabrics, enamels, clothes…..so I offered to illustrate the whole of the garden application.

sleep quilt

my first rough idea of how the bed will look when dressed.

We discuss the problem of the English weather, even in July, we will need a canopy. I imagine that you would not use the bed when it was raining, but at a pinch could hide under a canopy at the head of it – if we use a day bed. But the vision of a real romantic bed with curtains is still the main aim. This is when as a designer, you have to really listen carefully to the client – and try to find a compromise; a drawing, even a scrappy one often makes your point, the metal sub-structure of the canopy  will dominate the small garden.

quilt fabrics illo

the final illustration for the application.

Of course the one thing I  felt I must do was to inform Kaffe Fassett of our plans. So at our next quilt design meeting I showed him the scribbled design drawing and the other garden plans and asked for his “blessing” for the project and could he sponsor it with his fabrics? His immediate reaction was to offer more suggestions about the design using lots of other fabrics I could use.

I am leaving the next stage of illustrating the garden for the application for another post – watch this space.

 

 

 

15 thoughts on “sleeping in the garden

  1. That was so interesting and detailed Janet.mshall look forward to the finished item.

    • Hi Pat,
      my you were quick off the mark with your comment – i had just finished and was checking my site when i got this message – hopefully a lot more to come about this lovely commission

  2. Oh my, what a brave woman you are! I love Kaffee’s fabrics as they are but find them tricky to work with – and you make the project with them exclusively. Not to mention your stoicism for his re-designing idea :)))

    • Thanks – not brave I just want to keep working and preferably with creative people whatever their methods. Yes the Kaffe Fassett fabrics are certainly powerful but so enlivening and joyful – my main task is to make the fabrics live as part of the garden, not have the garden as backdrop to the fabrics – no easy thing.

      Janet

      • Oh yes, his fabrics love to pop up.
        I said you are brave because to fulfill customer’s expectations is hard enough but to go with another designer’s vision at the same time is even more challenging. Can’t wait to see the final result and thanks for sharing the whole process with us!

        Bozena

  3. Dear Jan, what a detailed account of the inception of the quilt. It’s reminded me of how hard we worked and how beautiful it will be. Here’s to a dream Tatton garden!! Julie x

  4. Lovely to read this blog, along side Julie Dunns
    Such creative talent……can’t wait to see the progression of this project.

    Jan, so inspiring…. thank-you 💜X

    • Hi J-M,
      thanks – you can see that I have my hands full at present, all commissions so it’s difficult to post anything about my work at moment, luckily I am coming to the conclusion of 2 more this month – it has been a busy winter keeping all this work under wraps
      Janx

  5. Beautiful blog post, Janet and a real treat to look at your drawings. Shared on FB. Love x Ila

  6. Hi Ilaria,
    thanks for all this – quilts are my main method of production at the moment – now why would that be??
    JX

  7. Jane Galpin sends her love ……student of yours at Bristol way back when ……..cx

    >

  8. Thank you very much for sharing your design process. I found this very interesting.

    • Hi Wendy,
      i have just received your message and went to your website – LOVE the cobweb quilt patches so full of movement and in the quilt is brilliantly coloured.
      Re. the sleeping garden quilt, i have to make it now!!!!!

      Janet

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