Janet Haigh : Her Work

Textiles: ideas, drawing, design, stitching….

Construct: Stitched Exhibition

9 Comments

 

Caryn Geffyn

Starter – Don’t make a Meal of it – Caren Garfen

I seldom feel that my work fits easily into contemporary textile exhibitions –  it often looks too colourful, or too decorative, or even too old fashioned in its simply stitched narratives…but recently I have work exhibited in a group exhibition that feels like I belong. “Construct – eight textile artists explore identity” is showing at the Ruthin Craft Centre in North Wales.  Much of the work is expressed in the form of stitched domestic textiles: tablecloths, curtains, quilts and some clothes, and so my own embroidered counterpanes, bolsters and pillow cases of dreams feel very much at home.

dream pillow 1

Hand embroidered Dream Pillow from my ‘Make it Through the Night’ series

I was invited to submit work earlier this year by Dr. Melanie Miller whom I met when we both gave presentations at the Textile Society’s annual conference, Embroidering the Truth in 2013. Melanie’s presentation was an up to the minute resume of textiles by recent graduates from MA courses; mine was an overview of my embroidered narrative commissioned works over the past 40 years. Melanie worked with June Hill to quickly bring a  focused exhibition together and also developed with Lisa Rostron, at Lawn Creative, an excellent and beautifully produced catalogue – well worth buying for a stand alone document even if you don’t catch the exhibition.

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printed patchwork bed cover – Caren Garfen

Walking into the exhibition space the large and airy gallery looks fresh and the work on the walls looks clean and tidy  – it also looks resolved. I often feel that much modern art textiles look like work in progress, like they have just been snatched out of the hands of the maker – full of possibilities and open to suggestion…  but here is a varied range of  ideas on identity, simply expressed with a rare degree of intent.

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Don’t Make a Meal of It detail. Caren Garfen

The work of Caren Garfen has many overlapping concerns with my own; she uses popular phrases and she employs a sly humour to subvert. Caren meticulously hand stitches screen printed images with messages found in advertising aimed at women to conform as thin glamorous domestic goddesses

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Wafer Thin – a study on the role of fat – Caren Garfen

Several of her pieces depict ranges of domestic tasks that usually fall to women to manage; the relentless repetition of her imagery, whether patched, printed or embroidered, echoes the repetitious nature of all domestic work, after all – a woman’s work is never done. The roll of fabric  printed and hand embroidered for ‘Wafer Thin’ is 10 metres long!

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Sarah Puts her Lipstick on – detail Naomi Ryder

Repetition is also a device used by Naomi Ryder – she records a daily task for many women – putting on make-up; for some a chore (me), for others a delight. By repeating the same but slightly varied image over a length of fabric she shows the time and energy spent on getting our public ‘identity’ in order before we go outdoors.The continuous daily tasks that women are expected to devote their time to – cleaning, ironing, shopping – she depicts by machine embroidering acutely observed small-scale line drawings onto lengths of sheer fabrics that recall net curtains.

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detail of Katherine’s Day, Naomi Ryder

Women’s work undertaken to construct an acceptable public identity is a subject shared by these 2 makers – but what of the men? Interestingly Nigel Hurlstone, I know, takes extreme care over his own personal presentation but as yet has never chosen to reflect on this in his work.

 

 

 

 

 

Nigel’s powerful group of stitched photographic portraits of men who have been very carefully costumed, create an ambivalent atmosphere – half jolly japes and half menace. The 9 pieces of work shown are based on a set of portraits of young men, taken between 1918 and 1950, in what could be construed as ‘fancy dress’  but presumably dressed up , or down, for the sexual delight of the photographer.

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machine embroidered photographic imagery – What Pleasure by Nigel Hurlstone

The men were dressed either as street urchins or soldiers and they were apparently picked up on the streets and then posed to conform to a sexual identity desired by the photographer…to my mind they look to be highly amused by the proceedings…..

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machine embroidered phot0graphic print – Nigel Hurlstone

However – the tight rows of machine stitching make the fabrics look like moire or water-marked and obscure the almost life-sized photographic images. I think this makes them initially more easily accessible to the viewer as we aren’t exactly sure of what we are seeing. The actual fabric is compelling, you can’t ‘read’ it easily and this allows the viewer an excuse for deeper scrutiny – close up and personal. The original subject matter was never meant to be for the public gaze,  at first glance the men look happy though not exactly innocent, but somehow when we are closer we are aware of an undertow of  sleaze or is it menace?

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Curtains to Independence – Women’s Auxiliary Service uniform made from vintage curtain material – Val Jackson

War and its effect on women’s change of identity is clearly a personal issue for Val Jackson. Her work deals with reflections upon her mother’s life – the uneasy transition from performing vital and fascinating war work in contrast to the traditional role of  wife and mother. Inheriting her mother’s effects, including her correspondence during the war, made it clear to Val that this transition had been difficult. The arresting burnt -orange curtain fabric uniform very neatly combines the 2, opposing? halves of a woman’s working life – the professional and the private.

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fabric figures ready for stop motion animation by Linda Barlow

From my own observations of friends and colleagues, the pull between motherhood and making your own work as an artist is a major modern predicament. Linda Barlow uses humour and cartoon representations to depict the complexities of managing this situation. Based on interviews with 8 such women she has made a short animated film – ‘Artist Mothers: a series of observations regarding the frustrations of being an artist and a mother”. It does what it says on the tin – refreshing not to have a punning title – I am guilty of the over use of puns myself…note for later.

Women artists often choose to who work within a community – I always think that this is half way between being a social worker and an artist and a really decent thing to pursue. Two such people have this type of work exhibited; Deidre Nelson,who has chosen to work around the world, using textiles as a means of defining the social history of an area, often working with local groups of people, and Lyn Setterington – who makes quilts based on the Kantha technique.

 

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Signature quilt – Lynn Setterington

Lyn also works on textile based projects within communities; quilt making is historically a community based production, so her own interest in the history of her chosen medium makes a natural lead to this activity. She has recently become fascinated by Signature Quilts and I share this interest – Crazy Quilts – which fascinate me, often contain signatures and messages and they do make the mind start the journey to who exactly made this. There is at present, in artists’ textiles, a fascination with writing as evidenced here – and as part of the education programme at Ruthin Craft Centre I have undertaken to teach 2 workshops for different styles of hand stitched writing while the exhibition is still showing in July.

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family names quilt detail- Lyn Setterington

Lynn sees the signature quilts as a form of social networking, as she brings groups of people together to make to celebrate their local community. A richly embroidered quilt stood out in the exhibition, the Streepur Quilt

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I enjoyed the wealth of embroidery that was evident on the quilts. Rich in many different stitches they are a testament that decorative embroidery is alive and well somewhere in the world. I can see pattern darning, running stitch, chain stitch, back stitch and coral knot just in these 4 samples as well as crochet and Broidery Anglaise even if machine made. I also like the change in “taste” that this quilt brought to the exhibition, they had so much energy and joyfulness – but maybe that is just a reflection of my identity as an embroiderer at heart.

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9 thoughts on “Construct: Stitched Exhibition

  1. This looks like a great exhibition and i especially love the last series of images here Janet, do you have a photo of the entire quilt by any chance? I’ll have to try and make a treck to North Wales otherwise!

    • Hi Christina, no I am afraid I do not have an image of the whole quilt as these images were taken at the PV so I had to keep dodging other people and the light was reflecting badly off the satin surface.

      BUT I do think that Ruthin Craft Centre is really worth the treck as the whole place is really vibrant with private studios open to the public and a good cafe as well.

  2. Hello Janet, just to say that I love your article about Construct….and it was really nice meeting you at the PV. Have you sent a link of your blog to Ruthin, Melanie and June? I am sure they would be pleased to see it…I am going to copy it to my ‘Caren Garfen – Artist’ page on Facebook, love Caren

    • Hi Caren,
      thanks for this, it was good to meet up at PV as you can see Melanie has received the blog info – I ran it past her on publication, just in case I stated the wrong info. I will let Ruthin staff know as well though, and thanks for links – every little helps…yours, Janet

  3. hello, just to let you know, we are swopping over a few of the quilts on Monday 2nd June, including this one (it’s going to an exhibition of Signature quilts in Nebraska) so if you did particularly want to see this one you need to do your road trip soon! The welsh 1915 quilt from Coedpoeth is also going, as well as Lynn’s ‘Self Portrait’ and ‘Who do you think you are’; however they will be replaced by a quilt from Rochdale, ‘Please sign here’; and a signature quilt that references FC United, the football club that was established by local supporters in the wake of the Glazer takeover. We will also be showing more of Val Jackson’s work, which will be an interesting addition to the body of work already there. Melanie

  4. thank you for posting about this exhibition – unable to get there i much appreciate the opportunity to see some of the work and read your thoughts
    i came across your post while trawling around the subject of signature quilts – i’m not a quilter but am considering putting together a “signature piece” for a forthcoming group project – lynn’s quilt and approach have caught my attention so i will be following that up – thank you for the signpost!
    what a joy it is to be a member of such a giving and sharing network of stitchers

    • Hi Eva,
      the signature quilts have a long tradition for works to celebrate community and now with our access to products for marking with water soluble pens they are easy to achieve. I hold regular classes at Heart Space studios for embroidering writing, and have included it in my “ongoing work”. Often the simplest stitches work out best – small running stitches are my favourites for larger signatures and to get people to write bigger get them to stand up to write their signature – the arm movement affords bigger writing…..I find this works in my classes. split stitch is best for smaller signatures and back stitch is a good basic that most people can manage to make look OK. And get people to follow their writing rather than just fill in the lines – this helps the flow and gives ease to the signature.

      good luck with the project. janet

      • thank you for the tips, i will bear those in mind – i wish i could come to one of your workshops but i’m too far away

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