Janet Haigh : Her Work

Textiles: ideas, drawing, design, stitching….

Taking a Line for a Dance

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Simple sample of machine embroidery by Susi Bancroft

“Taking a line for a dance” is a good way to describe what happens with free machine embroidery…the freedom with which the needle can stitch patterns, images and even writing very fast – is really fascinating to watch. First disengage the feed dog – I just love that name for the row of teeth embedded in the metal  plate below the needle….

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free machine embroidery using a hoop and the sprung needle

and either using a specially sprung embroidery needle, with or without the old school embroidery hoop to keep the fabric tight, it is possible to move the fabric enabling the still needle to make lines of stitches.

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first drawing by moving the paper and not the pencil

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moving page animal drawing – dog or cat?

Recently at Heart Space studios, Susi Bancroft taught a group of students how to achieve this technique in just one afternoon. First she got everyone to try to write their names or draw something by moving the paper while someone else held the pencil steady…with very unsteady results…but this is how machine embroidery works. She then got everyone stitching with reference to the drawings and suddenly things started to happen – fast

The first attempts at machining were definitely stronger than the pencil drawings. Susi always gets everyone to stitch in black cotton on white calico first, to gain a strong contrasting line..

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first attempt to stitch drawing and writing

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writing and dog drawing

It didn’t take long before everyone was feeling a lot more confident and  really getting to grips with larger scale drawings

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freely machine stitched dog portrait

One of the exercises offered was to copy a black and white drawing a drawing – with remarkable results considering no guide lines had been drawn beforehand.

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copying a line drawing of a fish – a free embroidery challenge.

Susi had also brought in a book of samples of her own work and showed the students these to demonstrate what else could be achieved now they had the basics…

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vermicelli linear stitching sample – Susi Bancroft

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sample machined writing – Susi Bancroft

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now the colour started to be sampled, this is where all textile people get excited – endless possibilities just by changing the thread ….

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playing with coloured free machine with extra outlines

and appliqued fabrics started to appear – each person had brought some form of inspirational work, either an illustrated card or photographs and drawings

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working small appliqued motifs from a commercial card design

Now I know that working with the sprung embroidery or darning needle means that the hoops aren’t necessary, but Susi feels that for the first attempts everyone should adopt a belt and braces attitude, the fabric needs to be as taut at possible to get the best results. When everyone feels confident of drawing then they can remove the hoop – however most people took advantage of this restriction – this work below is already framed – it actually reads ” I am Very Happy”

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circular embroidery made by keeping to frame restrictions.

and here the nuisance of not being able to manouvre the stitching past the hoops intrusive clamps has made a new design from the original card – go with the flow…..

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design due to the constricting clamps – this is what sampling is all about – work with what you have got.

Some more renditions of photographs and cards start to take on a life of their own – this is why I think that copying something inspirational is a good way to start off any new technique, the worry of design is taken away and suddenly invention takes over..

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copying the design in fabrics brings so much more pattern and texture

and working from lovely photographs is often a good way to get started – the fabric soon asserts itself.

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photographic inspiration works for a colour gamut to get things going.

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